Sundays: 10:30 AM
Child care and religious education for children are provided during services.  • SEE MORE

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LINK TO SAVE A SEAT

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Message from Rev. David

The following is an excerpt from our minister's column in the November issue of Contact, our monthly newsletter. Thanksgiving brings thoughts of pilgrims and Puritans. David reminds us that while we have abandoned our religious ancestors' belief in a cruel God, the earliest colonists have a lot to teach us about focusing on the common good.
FROM OUR MINISTER
"Some people are your relatives but others are your ancestors, and you choose the ones
you want to have as ancestors. You create yourself out of those values."
Ralph Ellison
"Among our ancestors are the Puritan Separatists who founded Plymouth. Nearly two centuries after the colonists landed, those congregational churches would vote to call Unitarian ministers. The First Parish Church in Plymouth, Massachusetts, the very one founded by the pilgrims in 1620, is Unitarian today. Like us, they bound their churches together by covenant, the promises they made to each other about how they would dwell together. Like us, they had a congregational polity which knew no higher human authority than the congregation itself, in which the minister and teacher were elected by the members.

The Puritans were on the one hand, wholly invested in their relationship to the all powerful, terrifying, cruel god of their understanding they were closer in years to the middle ages than to the present day. But they also believed deeply in the commonweal; the common good, the welfare and wellbeing of all. Their commitment to the common good became so fundamental to the New England psyche that when the time comes for statehood, the citizen of Massachusetts did not become a state, but rather, a commonwealth.

The Puritan colonists invested their lives in each other. They did not think of themselves as private, autonomous people. Instead, they fundamentally understood that they were part of a body: they were one single, whole people, all together, and that their lives depended on each other. Not just their livelihood, not just their survival, but their lives. And in this, they are our ancestors."
Click on CONTACT to the left of this page to read David's article in full.

Kids 5 to 12 years old

Beginning, December 12th, children aged five through twelve, who are fully vaccinated, are invited to attend the first part of the church service to hear "the story for all ages."  They will then leave to attend their UU Education classes, where everyone who is with them is fully vaccinated.

Buddhist Meditation

Reverend Marcia Curtis For more information please click redlotussangha.org.

Religious Education

Childcare for our youngest is available during services.
                

All children are welcome!   

 

 

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