Sundays: 10:30 AM
Child care and religious education for children are provided during services.  • SEE MORE

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Open Book Discussion

The group meets the 2nd Monday of the month at 7:30 pm, usually at a member's house.   All are welcome as we discuss a broad range of fiction and non-fiction, classical and modern.

ALL ARE INVITED TO ATTEND ~ OPEN DISCUSSION

Please contact the church office for Book Club Meeting locations when not listed here.


 

January 14  A Gentleman in Moscow (Amor Towles)
Amor Towles skillfully transports us to The Metropol, the famed Moscow hotel where movie stars and Russian royalty hobnob, where Bolsheviks plot revolutions and intellectuals discuss the merits of contemporary Russian writers, where spies spy, thieves thieve and the danger of twentieth century Russia lurks outside its marbled walls. It’s also where wealthy Count Alexander Rostov lives under house arrest for a poem deemed incendiary by the Bolsheviks, and meets Nina. Nina is a precocious and wide-eyed young girl who holds the keys to the entire hotel, wonders what it means to be a princess, and will irrevocably change his life. Despite being confined to the hallway of the hotel, the Count lives an absorbing, adventure-filled existence, filled with capers, conspiracies and culture... Towles magnificently conjures the grandeur of the Russian hotel and the vibrancy of the characters that call it home. (Al Woodworth, The Amazon Book Review)
 
February 11 The Sparrow (Mary Doria Russell)
A visionary work that combines speculative fiction with deep philosophical inquiry, The Sparrow tells the story of a charismatic Jesuit priest and linguist, Emilio Sandoz, who leads a scientific mission entrusted with a profound task: to make first contact with intelligent extraterrestrial life. The mission begins in faith, hope, and beauty, but a series of small misunderstandings brings it to a catastrophic end (from the Publisher).
 
March 11   Ender’s Game (Orson Scott Card)
This futuristic tale involves aliens, political discourse on the Internet, sophisticated computer games, and an orbiting battle station. Yet the reason it rings true for so many is that it is first and foremost a tale of humanity; a tale of a boy struggling to grow up into someone he can respect while living in an environment stripped of choices. Ender's Game is a must-read book for science fiction lovers, and a key conversion read for their friends who "don't read science fiction."
 
Ender's Game won both the Hugo and the Nebula the year it came out. Writer Orson Scott Card followed up this honor with the first-time feat of winning both awards again the next year for the sequel, Speaker for the Dead (Bonnie Bouman The Amazon Book Review).
 
April 8       Factfulness: Ten Reasons We’re Wrong Abput the World—and Why Things are Better Than You Think
(Hans Rosling and Anna Rosling Rönnlund)
 [Factfulness] throws down a gauntlet to doom-and-gloomers in global health by challenging preconceptions and misconceptions [and] is a fabulous read, succinct and lively… This magnificent book ends with a plea for a factual world view. Rosling was optimistic that thisoutlook will spread, because it is a useful navigational tool in a complex world, and a genuine antidote to negativity and hopelessness (Nature).


In good reading

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Buddhist Meditation

Reverend Marcia Curtis invites you to participate in a Buddhism-based meditation in a group setting. Join us Sundays at 7:30pm in the church sanctuary. Newcomers welcome.

Religious Education

       

Childcare for our youngest is available during services.
                

                        All children are welcome!   

 

 

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